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Player Ratings Tool

I put together a little dashboard I think could be a handy/fun tool for GMs to play around with. Before I link it, there are a few things I wanted to clarify, such as application/limitations...

Application

In short, the dashboard displays a list of players ranked by their AVG, which simply put is the average of the player's PA, PC, and SC ratings (this is not the player's OV, or AOV). It's also the reason why I decided to only include forwards, because naturally I found this average is not nearly as good a representation of a defenseman's true value. Of course, it doesn't paint the full picture of a forward's true value either, something I want to acknowledge up front, but I find it offers up a much more accurate representation for forwards than it does defensemen. 

df1

Below that you will find individual rankings for each standalone category (PA, PC, and SC). 

df2

On the right-hand side, you can filter by team, player, and position, as well as a fourth category titled Class. Class is a metric I divised to bin players into 5 distinct categories based on their AVG rating:

1st Line = top 31 at their respective position

2nd Line = top 62 at their respective position

3rd Line = top 93 at their respective position

4th line = top 124 at their respective position

Replacement Level is anything below that threshold (any players below 60AOV have been filtered out for the puposes of this exercise)

So in theory, you will have 31 1st Line Centers, 31 2nd Line Centers, 31 3rd Line Centers, and 31 4th Line Centers, or more intuitively, one for every team. Same goes for LW and RW. If you hover over a player you will also notice that they have a Class for each individual rating (PA, PC, and SC). If they are Class (PA): 1st Line for e.g., that means that player's PA rating ranks within the top 31 for their respective position based only on PA ratings, and so on. 

Limitations

Binning is well known in statistics for its limitations. For instance, Derrick Brassard is the t-31st ranked 1st Line Center according to our Class metric, with an AVG of 73. Conversely, Jonathan Toews is tied with Teuvo Teravainen as the top ranked 2nd Line Center at 72 AVG. We can clearly see there is hardly anything that separates the two, however, according to our classification, as a 1st Line Center Brassard is akin to top ranked Center Nathan Mackinnon (92 AVG), whereas as a 2nd Line Center Toews is instead akin to Calle Jarnkrok (63 AVG), the lowest ranked 2nd Line Center. 

That said, I do think the dashboard has its applications (so long as we are cognisant of the aforementioned limitations). Afterall, hockey is a sport that naturally lends itself to binning, by placing players into these distinct categories in the first place. So without further adieu, here's the link that GMs can use to test it out - https://public.tableau.com/profile/alex7947#!/vizhome/NEFHLRatings/Dashboard1?publish=yes

Let me know if you have any suggestions/feedback, or if you can think of similar applications that might be handy.

*I will try to update it semi-regulary as players change positions/move teams.

**Team Null = Unsigned Players